Core Rules

"And I heard as it were the noise of thunder one of four marshals saying, `There is no hope, only rules.`"
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Rules are a fundamental aspect to the game. They compose the system which players utilize to interact with one another and the environment on an in-game level outside of simple role playing in order to affect the game world. We will cover all of the core mechanical concepts and principles for the game in this article. The Core Rules encompass the most fundamental aspects of playing the game and should be used as a primary basis for understanding our more specific and in-depth rules.

Game States

Game States are basic but very important rules to understand about the game. There are two main Game States, "Out of Game" and "In Game", each with additional "sub-states" that fall under a respective main state.

Some general rules regarding these two main states are as follows:

  • People who are out-of-game are generally not allowed to interact with anyone who is in-game and vice versa.
    • Exceptions to this do exist, usually as a result of certain sub-states, which can be found in the explanations for these states.
  • Items, like people, can have either and In Game or Out of Game classification.in the same ways, and generally speaking, out-of-game people cannot interact with in-game items and in-game characters cannot interact with out-of-game items.
    • Once again, exceptions to this may exist as the result of sub-states.
  • Sleeping does not change a person’s game state. All sleeping attendees should be considered in-game, either as a character they play or as an NPC (Non Player-Character)
    • In order to sleep in-game as an NPC, a player must first get approval from a qualified marshal.
    • In the case of medical or other personal considerations a player wishes to sleep out-of-game, that player must first get permission from a qualified marshal. Appropriate headbands must still be worn while sleeping.
  • Certain predetermined areas at the game will likely be designated as out-of-game areas. Everyone and everything in these areas should be considered permanently out-of-game regardless of headbands/markings.
  • Unless specifically told to or allowed by a qualified marshal, a person who transitions from an in-game to out-of-game or vice versa may only do so if, in-so-doing, the atmosphere of the game and game ambiance is not disturbed. Breaking game ambiance is a broad interpretation and is subject to the opinion of a qualified marshal, but may result in rules violations. Things to avoid would include (but not be limited to) quickly transitioning from in-game to out-of-game to prevent your in-game character from being attacked or quickly transitioning from out-of-game to in-game to assist a fellow in-game character with warding off an attacker.

Out of Game States

Any player who is "Out of Game" (or "OOG" for short) is, put simply, currently not actively playing a character at the time. Someone who is out-of-game is required to wear a white headband in order to denote that they are out-of-game. To signify someone is Out of Game, a white headband must be worn in a clearly-visible fashion upon the head. For items or locations, a white sheet, tie, or sign placed neatly and/or which clearly states "Out of Game"/"OOG" is required.

There are three sub-types of the Out of Game state:

Pro Tip!
Buddy christ.jpg
"CLARIFY: Your face. I like that shit."
Don't be afraid to call HOLD. It's better to be safe than sorry. Also, use CLARIFY as often as you need. It's a great way for you to get familiar with the game and the rules without you needing to memorize everything beforehand!
  • HOLD
"HOLD" is a term usable by anyone who wants to call a temporary suspension of all in-game game states immediately. "HOLD" must be shouted loudly by whoever wishes to call the "HOLD" and may be done so for important in-game or out-of-game of reasons. Valid reasons for calling a "HOLD" include (but are not limited to) out-of-game injuries or important marshal announcements. When a "HOLD" is called, everyone that is in the vicinity of the "HOLD" must immediately stop everything they are doing and take a knee if possible. Only qualified Marshals may move around or speak during "HOLDS" in order to resolve the issue that the "HOLD" was called for.
  • CLARIFY
"CLARIFY" is another type of out-of-game game state. "CLARIFY" is a term usable by anyone who wants to call a temporary suspension of very localized in-game gameplay in order to clarify something on an out-of-game level. "CLARIFY" must be spoken clearly by whoever wishes to call the "CLARIFY" and may be done so for the purposes of obtaining an out-of-game understanding for an in-game situation. Valid reasons for calling a "CLARIFY" include (but are not limited to) inquiring about the effects of a particular Power or skill or inquiring about what an in-game character perceives. Use of Knowledges or other certain skills can also be called with "CLARIFY".
  • SCENE
"SCENE" is a term that is exclusively used by Marshals who wish to describe an in-game depiction or scenario to a group of players. It can be used often to further the suspense of disbelief at the game. It can also be used to enhance the imaginative physical representations used by Marshals during gameplay. While the term "CLARIFY" is used mostly for mechanical or logistical purposes, "SCENE" is used strictly by Marshals to enhance the storytelling or plot of a game event.

In Game States

In the simplest terms, any player who is not Out of Game can be assumed to be In Game, or "IG" for short. Someone who is In Game is not required to wear a headband of any kind unless they are in a special sub-state of the in-game game state.

There are three sub-types of the In Game state:

  • Hidden Presence
    Someone who is in a “Hidden Presence” state is required to wear an orange headband. This sub-state is used for things such as camouflage, hiding in shadows, and other similarly-concealed entities. Unless otherwise specified, "Hidden Presence" will 'break' if a character's movements or interactions draws attention to them and are noticed by others. In this sense, a character who is in Hidden Presence must always attempt to be role playing that they are trying to remain hidden, lest the effect immediately end (unless otherwise specified). Any characters wishing to notice another character who is under a "Hidden Presence" effect require use of an ability that states they can notice hidden characters.
    • In Game items under a "Hidden Presence" effect must be marked with an orange glow stick or orange tie, and similar rules apply regarding character interaction with "Hidden Presence" items.
    • Invisibility is a special type of "Hidden Presence" used by characters that are invisible, unseen spirits, teleporting through dimensions or other planes of existence, etc., and any characters trying to see them would require use of an ability that states that they can see or track Invisible targets.
  • Elsewhere
Characters who are in the same out-of-game physical location as other characters but are in a different in-game location are required to wear green headbands. Characters who are "Elsewhere" can be considered to be out-of-game for purposes of interaction with non-"Elsewhere" characters, but can freely interact in-game with other "Elsewhere" characters in the same location.

In addition to the formal sub-types of being In Game, there are three additional categories of in-game status that govern certain role play scenarios:

  • Willing
"Willing" characters are those whose players give out-of-game consent to allow an in-game action to be committed, and requires the character to intentionally go out of their way to invite or welcome a specifically-present, in-game scenario, situation, altercation, etc. with another character.
  • Incapacitated
“Incapacitated” characters are characters that are physically unable to resist in-game actions that could be done to them as a result of being knocked unconscious through some sort of in-game means or through the character being completely bound and unable to move.
  • Helpless
“Helpless” characters refer to characters that are dying or near death, on the ground and crawling in his or her appropriate down or death count, the player out-of-game being asleep as a character, and / or the character having absolutely no way of responding to the in-game situation to even somewhat possibly be able to in-game role play stopping, resisting, avoiding, or getting away from the in-game action being performed against them (*Note – this does not require the character to actually need an ability to do this, just the will and role play capability of not being helpless).

Prerequisites

Prerequisites are a list of requirements which are needed in order for a character to learn and / or use a Class List, an Ability on a Class List, use or wear an item, or perform some other in-game action. Prerequisites can range from having a certain attribute score number or range, possessing a certain list, or having a particular ability. Furthermore, there may be a separate Level Requirement to learn or use Classes or Abilities respectively.

It is important to note that some Classes or Abilities may imply a prerequisite without actually listing something as a prerequisite. These are known as Implied Prerequisites and they are considered to be rational leaps of logic when it comes to what prerequisites would logically be in place for a particular Class or Ability. This rule exists for the sole purpose of potential oversights with prerequisites and minimizing over-clarification. However, actual prerequisites will be continuously updated to be as specific as possible as rules continue to be changed, updated, and clarified.

Ranks

Ranks are categories used as a way to define how potent Abilities are in the game, as well as how advanced a Class is. Ranks also determine the general hierarchy of abilities and classes in terms of prerequisites, supersession, and overall proficiency. For example, in order to learn something at Expert Rank, a character must first learn the Basic Rank equivalent (this concept generally applies to both Abilities and Classes).

As a general concept:

  • Basic Rank can be considered a rudimentary framework of conceptual development, and implies a character's simple understanding of class and ability concept.
  • Expert Rank can be considered an advanced framework of conceptual development, and implies a character's advanced understanding of class and ability concept.
  • Master Rank can be considered a complex framework of conceptual development, and implies a character's complete understanding of class and ability concept.
  • Super Rank can be considered a supernatural framework of conceptual development, and implies a character's superhuman understanding of class and ability concept.

Attributes

Pro Tip!
Tabletop.jpg
Where's the Mountain Dew?!
Our Attributes are very similar to Ability Scores in D20 Tabletop games like Dungeons and Dragons. Since many LARPers are often also table toppers or are at least familiar with tabletop gaming, it's an easy-to-follow reference that will help you understand what our Attribute system is like conceptually.

If the numbers and concepts are overwhelming, don't worry. All that's important for you to know is that your character has these "Attributes" and they need them to be able to learn and perform their abilities, so work with a marshal to make sure your character is built in a way that you can get the cool things you want your character to be able to do!

Characters in the game have what are called Attributes. Attributes correspond to a character’s general physical, mental, spiritual, and social prowess. These Attributes are measured with a numerical value and are essential in calculating a character’s ability to possess or even perform certain abilities at all, the aptitude in which a character can perform certain abilities with, the capability to possess or utilize items, and more. Each attribute has a score range which denotes how potent a particular attribute may be.

Unless otherwise specified by an ability, a character may not have more than a score of 7 in any given Attribute. Attribute scores can also be prerequisites for abilities in the game and may grant additional bonuses.

Score Chart

Score Range Description
0 An attribute that falls within this score range means that a character is non-functioning. Physically or mentally, the character cannot have a score in this range, lest it mean the character is severely disabled, in a coma, or dead.
1-2 This is a poor score, showing below average aptitude in the given attribute and possibly a disability.
3-4 This is an average score, showing average aptitude in the given attribute.
5-6 This is an above-average score, showing a high aptitude in a given attribute.
7 This is the maximum-level attribute a normal character can achieve, having attained the limit of what is normally possible.
8-9 This is a historically unmatched score range that only the most famous or infamous of names throughout history have theoretically achieved. Think of Albert Einstein or Stephen Hawking with an Intelligence of 9, Sun Tzu or Alexander the Great with a Wisdom of 8, Hulk Hogan with a Strength of 8, etc.
10+ This is a mythological score range that only those of legends, fables, or fiction may have attained. Hercules would have a Strength of 10 or higher, Lieutenant Commander Data would have an Intelligence of 10 or higher, Jesus of Nazareth would have a Wisdom and Influence of 10 or higher, etc.

Strength

Strength represents how physically strong a character is and may affect how much physical damage a character does, how much a character can lift, or assist in performing other strength-based feats.
  • Score 1-2: The character strikes for -10 total physical melee damage, to a minimum of 2, and is unable to move or carry Incapacitated targets.
  • Score 3-4: The character is able to pick up and walk at a slow pace, nearly heal-to-toe, with incapacitated targets.
  • Score 5-6: The character is also able to pick up and swiftly walk, but not jog or run, with incapacitated targets. Please note that if the target is incapable of moving that quickly OOG, then the character can only move as fast as the target can move OOG.
  • Score 7: The character strikes for +2 numerical melee damage per hand. The character is also able to pick up and run with incapacitated targets. Please note that if the target is incapable of moving that quickly OOG, then the character can only move as fast as the target can move OOG.
  • Score 8-9: The character strikes for +4 numerical melee damage per hand and damage cap for that character is increased by +4.
  • Score 10+: The character strikes for +6 numerical melee damage per hand and damage cap for that character is increased by +6.

Stamina

Stamina represents how much physical endurance a character has and may affect how much physical damage a character can take, how much pain a character can endure, or assist in performing other endurance-based feats.
  • Score 1-2: The character has a base of 4 Hit Points and Pain Effects last +1 Time Interval and have twice the effect.
  • Score 3-4: The character has a base of 12 Hit Points.
  • Score 5-6: The character has a base of 16 Hit Points. Lockout 1 Hour. The character may invoke their attribute score and hard number to negate any single Pain effect up to a maximum of Basic Rank.
  • Score 7: The character has a base of 20 Hit Points. Lockout 1 Hour. The character may invoke their attribute score and hard number to negate any single Pain effect up to a maximum of Expert Rank.
  • Score 8-9: The character has a base of 28 Hit Points. Lockout 1 Hour. The character may invoke their attribute score and hard number to negate any single Pain effect up to a maximum of Master Rank.
  • Score 10+: The character has a base of 36 Hit Points. Lockout 1 Hour. The character may invoke their attribute score and hard number to negate any single Pain effect up to a maximum of Super Rank.

Dexterity

Dexterity represents how physically agile and dexterous a character is and may affect skills that have to do with accuracy, avoiding strikes, or assist in performing other agility-based feats.
  • Score 1-2: The character character cannot move more quickly than a slow walking pace or they will automatically be affected by an undefendable trip effect every 5 seconds.
  • Score 3-4: No penalty or bonus.
  • Score 5-6: The character has +1 to their base number of Physical Power Uses.
  • Score 7: The character has +2 to their base number of Physical Power Uses.
  • Score 8-9: The character has +3 to their base number of Physical Power Uses and gains +2 Agility.
  • Score 10+: The character has +4 to their base number of Physical Power Uses and gains +4 Agility.

Intelligence

Intelligence represents how mentally knowledgeable a character is in terms of conceptual understanding. Intelligence may affect how much knowledge a character has, how capable a character is at solving mental challenges or problems, or assist in performing other knowledge-based feats.
  • Score 1-2: The character takes twice as long to learn Abilities as normal and can only earn a maximum of 2 AP per event.
  • Score 3-4: No penalty or bonus.
  • Score 5-6: The character earns +1 AP per event, to a maximum of 4.
  • Score 7: The character earns +1 AP per event to a maximum of 4 and can choose to have one self-taught ability per event count as though it was Taught via the Teach Ability.
  • Score 8-9: The character earns +2 AP per event to a maximum of 5 and can choose to have two self-taught abilities per event count as though they were Taught via the Teach Ability.
  • Score 10+: The character earns +2 AP per event to a maximum of 5 and all self-taught Abilities for that character count as though they were Taught via the Teach Ability.

Wisdom

Wisdom represents how mentally clever and enduring a character is in terms of mental application. Wisdom may affect how much foresight a character has in a situation, how observant or strong-willed a character is, or assist in performing other wisdom-based feats.
  • Score 1-2: Mind Effects last +1 Time Interval as long on the character and the character has no concept of deception (either being deceitful or identifying deceit).
  • Score 3-4: No penalty or bonus.
  • Score 5-6: The character has +1 to their base number of Cerebral Power Uses. Lockout 1 Hour. The character may invoke their attribute score and hard number to negate any single Mind effect up to a maximum of Basic Rank.
  • Score 7: The character has +2 to their base number of Cerebral Power Uses. Lockout 1 Hour. The character may invoke their attribute score and hard number to negate any single Mind effect up to a maximum of Expert Rank.
  • Score 8-9: The character has +3 to their base number of Cerebral Power Uses. Lockout 1 Hour. The character may invoke their attribute score and hard number to negate any single Mind effect up to a maximum of Master Rank.
  • Score 10+: The character has +4 to their base number of Cerebral Power Uses. Lockout 1 Hour. The character may invoke their attribute score and hard number to negate any single Mind effect up to a maximum of Super Rank.

Influence

Influence represents how forceful of will and personality a character has in terms of general presence. Influence may affect perception of self by others, how much of a personal connection a character has with others, or assist in performing other force-of-will based feats.
  • Score 1-2: The character has -1 D&T Actions that they can perform per month, cannot benefit from Bonus, and earns only 1 unit for every 2 offered for any contract (rounded to the nearest 5 units at the end if the number of units earned does not wind up ending in a 0).
  • Score 3-4: No penalty or bonus.
  • Score 5-6: The character has +1 to their base number D&T Points. Lockout weekend. The character may invoke their attribute score and hard number to gain an additional Bonus for a single contract use up to a maximum of Basic Rank.
  • Score 7: The character has +2 to their base number D&T Points. Lockout weekend. The character may invoke their attribute score and hard number to gain an additional Bonus for a single contract use up to a maximum of Expert Rank.
  • Score 8-9: The character has +3 to their base number D&T Points. Lockout weekend. The character may invoke their attribute score and hard number to gain an additional Bonus for a single contract use up to a maximum of Master Rank.
  • Score 10+: The character has +4 to their base number D&T Points. Lockout weekend. The character may invoke their attribute score and hard number to gain an additional Bonus for a single contract use up to a maximum of Super Rank.

Actual vs. Effective

A character always has a "hard" or "actual" Attribute Score number for any of his or her Attributes. This number represents the Character's total Attribute Score, including any and all permanent Abilities that specify they raise the character's Attribute Score permanently. A character's "hard" or "actual" Attribute Score is used to determine the Character's permanent Attribute Bonuses as outlined in the Attribute Tables as well as used for Class Access Prerequisites.

A character's "Effective Score" is a secondary permanent (or, in some cases with the use of certain Abilities, temporary) Attribute Score total that is used for the purposes of at-event marshal difficulty challenge checks and / or learning Abilities with Attribute Score prerequisites. Effective Scores are not counted for Attribute prerequisites for the purposes of Class Access.

Origins

Origins are, essentially, what any potential character is or where that character came from. Like any good superhero from a comic book, every character should have a unique, awesome Origin story. At face value, an Origin might seem similar to a "race" so-to-speak, but an Origin should not necessarily be limited to that stereotype. There are many aspects to Origins that make them break the typical mold for what a character is and where a character came from.

For a comprehensive list of playable Origins and their respective rules and concepts, please see Origins.

Classes

A Class, also known as a Character Class or, sometimes, a List or Lists, is a conceptual descriptor for a character based on role play appropriateness and available Abilities. They can be considered predefined "lists" of Abilities and unique rules that allow a character to be categorized under the name of the class as a general blanket so that people can easily define and understand what types of skills and powers the character will have. Class-specific Abilities will always be mechanically synergistic, maximizing the usefulness and playability of any given Character Class.

For a comprehensive list of playable Classes and their respective rules and concepts, please see Classes.

Abilities

Pro Tip!
Confusedjackie.jpg
...I can't even... huh?
Don't get too bogged down on the specifics here. A lot of this stuff here is for the hardcore rules lawyers of gaming. All this boils down to is that your character can get sweet sweet abilities that do cool things and most of them operate in some kind of a special, predefined way. What's really, ultimately important is that you understand how your own character's individual abilities work when you get them. And, remember, if you ever don't understand how something works, just use CLARIFY!

Ability” is a generic term used to describe any mechanical representation for in-game interactions. There are two basic types of Abilities: Skills and Powers.

Overview

All Abilities have PrerequisitesTypeEffectAbility Point (AP) Cost, and Mode.

  • Prerequisites for Abilities exist for balancing purposes so that characters must follow a logical and steady progression within a particular character list. 
  • Types are a categorical definition of abilities used to determine the cost for using the ability (if applicable) as well as for a number of mechanical-effect identification purposes.
  • Effects are simply the end result of using an ability. Effects are described within the specific Ability being used from a list.
  • AP cost is a weighted numerical value assigned to each ability in the game which plays into the number of total abilities a character can learn in any given event based on available AP to that character. AP can also act as a gauge for how powerful an ability may be.
  • Modes explain the logistical application of the mechanical effect of any given Ability in the game. Every Ability in the game must have an associated Mode. The different Modes can be viewed below:
    • Invoked. Invoked Modes are Modes that require a trigger. The most common type of Invoked Mode is a “latent” or “dormant” Power that a person may choose to activate at will. Other Invoked Modes do exist, however, and triggers are not always willful. Look to specific Powers which may cause or stipulate an automatic invocation. Unless otherwise specified, all Powers that have an Invoked Mode will remain dormant or latent for one period before fading, unless they are invoked for use before then.
    • Ongoing. Ongoing Modes are Modes that last indefinitely. Unlike Permanent Modes, an Ongoing Mode is a Mode that happens due to an initiation factor. Initiation factors can range from utilizing certain Powers to damage received from a weapon strike to a trap that triggers another effect. These examples all count as Ongoing Modes because the effect of each is Ongoing until otherwise removed permanently whereas Permanent Modes are always on unless subsided temporarily.
    • Permanent. Permanent Modes are Modes that last forever and are always present unless temporarily subsided. Any skill in the game that simply forever grants an in-game effect indefinitely is considered a Permanent Mode. Unless otherwise specified, all non-Power Abilities will count as Permanent Modes.
    • Temporary. Temporary Modes are Modes that last for a duration. Similar to Ongoing Modes, these Modes usually have an initiation factor, but the effect will only last for a finite period of time.

Skills and Powers

In the game, Skills and Powers are two discrete terms:

  • Skills are permanent Abilities that grant some kind of ever-lasting bonus to the character.
  • Powers are Abilities that can be permanently learned or known by a character, but require some kind of cost expenditure in order to be utilized as a real-time simulated action by the character. Powers may also have various role play requirements associated with using them, including, but not limited to, length of time role playing the use of a Power.

For more detailed information on how Abilities, Skills, and Powers work, please see Abilities. For a list of all Abilities in the game, please see Abilities List.

Life and Death

Another very important aspect to the game is the understanding of the concepts of life and death within the game world. Life in the game world is quantified using a Hit System in which numerical values are applied to offensive abilities and strikes, defensive abilities, and health-based numerical pools. For the purposes of easy math, these numbers are always measured in factors and / or increments of 2.

Hit Points

The amount of Hit Points possessed by a character determines how much direct numerical damage their body can sustain before they become nearly incapacitated. A character, unless otherwise specified by an ability, may never fall below 0 Hit Points. By default, any numerical damage that would cause a character to fall below 0 Hit Points instead reduces that character’s Hit Point total to 0. When a character has 0 Hit Points, they are considered Helpless.

Characters also have a maximum Hit Point cap, unless otherwise specified by an ability. This Hit Point cap varies depending upon the highest rank of class that a character has:

  • Basic: 42
  • Expert: 84
  • Master: 144

Down Count

When a person suffers damage and is reduced to 0 Hit Points, they enter into what is known as the Down Count. During this time, the character must fall down a crawling position or lay down as though unconscious and they have a 5-minute period of time in which they must count. During this time, any normal healing effect, be it supernatural or otherwise, will bring the character back to full function, healing them for whatever numerical value the particular Supernatural Power or effect happened to be for. There is no limit to how many times a character can enter into the Down Count and no limit to how many times they can be healed and brought out of the Down Count. While in the Down Count, a character may crawl, groan, act semi-incapacitated, or otherwise act in a way that suggests he or she is "down for the count," but may not administer any type of healing to themselves, unless otherwise specified by an item or ability. When characters first go into Down Count, all temporary effects are instantly ended. Temporary Hit Point granting effects cannot bring targets out of Down Count.

After 5 minutes of being in their Down Count, a character will get back up, fully functional, at 2 Hit Points.

Coup De Grace

Coup De Grace” is a free “skill” that everyone in the game can call on an unconscious, sleeping, or otherwise completely incapacitated target. Coup De Grace can also be delivered to a character in his or her Down Count to force that character into his or her Death Count. Coup De Grace automatically reduces the target’s Hit Point total to 0 and places them in the Death Count. Some Powers may allow for targets that are Coup De Graced to suffer a detriment or for the character delivering the Coup De Grace to gain some sort of benefit. There is no limit to the number of negative Coup De Grace Powers that a target can suffer. However, if a target is Coup De Graced by a character and that character benefits from a Power for doing so, then no other beneficial effect can be garnered by delivering another Coup De Grace to that same target unless the target first resurrects or receives a life effect that works, regardless of whether the beneficial effect would be garnered by the same character or a different character. Coup De Grace may not be called on a target that is already in his or her Death Count.

Death Count

Pro Tip!
Death.jpg
Oh, great. I asked for Advil, but you know, Tylenol, whatever.
So, a one-death system may seem pretty scary, especially when compared to other games where there are many ways to continuously resurrect. However, unlike most games, characters never "bleed out" from Down Count into Death Count except in very specific situations. And, even then, there are ways to bring someone out of Death Count. Don't get us wrong, death is extremely scary in the game and should be feared, but rest assured that characters don't drop like flies and you will be able get a full, long, enjoyable experience out of your characters.

There are certain abilities, including but not limited to Coup De Grace, which can force a character that is in his or her Down Count to enter into what is known as the Death Count. Unlike the Down Count, the Death Count has no countdown; players may remain in the Death Count for as long as he or she chooses. During this time, no standard methods of numerical healing, be they supernatural or not, will affect the character. It is during the Death Count that only a Life Effect will bring a character back to life. There is no limit to how many times a character can enter into the Death Count, but there is a limit to how many times a character can receive a life-effect. A character may only receive one life-effect via Item and one life-effect via Ability per game event. Upon taking a Life Effect it must be noted by the giver of the ability in your Character Notes section. Any time during the Death Count, the player may choose to have the character’s "soul" leave the body, essentially leaving a lifeless corpse that cannot be healed through any normal means of any kind.

As long as a player chooses to stay as a corpse, there are possible benefits. There may be skills and special Extraordinary Powers or items in the game that allow characters to speak with the dead as well as skills or extremely powerful Extraordinary Powers and / or items or abilities which may be able to Resuscitate a character back to life. If a player chooses to have the character’s soul leave the body, then the character is considered dead and cannot come back unless he or she receives a Resurrection effect.

Resurrection

Once a character willingly ends his or her Death Count, that character is beyond saving from normal life effects and almost nothing can bring that character back. The only way to bring a character back from complete death in this fashion is with an ability or item that will Resurrect the character. Any items or abilities in the game that do this are very rare and, beyond that, resurrection may not always work and has an entirely plot-controlled result. As such, the game can be considered a "One-Death System."

Character Death and Retirement

Should a character fail to resurrect, or the player willingly "retires" the character and turns the character over to the control of Plot, the player may create a new character using the Retirement System.

Combat

One of the most intrinsic and important rules to discuss are combat rules. Combat is a large part of the game and having a full understanding of the combat rules is essential to playing. Combat is the simulation of fighting between characters in which Powers and Skills are used in conjunction with physical representations of weapons, abilities, and protection.

Non-Combat and Special Interactive Considerations

Before we get into the full combat rules, we will discuss the concept that there are players who will be incapable of being in a combat scenario and / or who have special interactive considerations. Players who are incapable of being in combat due to medical reasons should be considered "non-combat." Non-combat players are required to wear a bright yellow (neon or reflective if possible) headband or armband with the words "NON-COMBAT" clearly visible and large. Additionally, non-combat players are forbidden from actively engaging in any type of combat without exception, including striking others physically or being struck by others physically. Regular Players who encounter non-combat players are allowed to call any ability or numerical damage that he or she has against that non-combat player by staying roughly 12 inches outside of weapon's distance, pointing the weapon at the target, and calling the ability or damage. For ranged weapons, nerf weapons, or power packets, the regular player may call "Non-combat!" and then the ability name or damage as a "perfect aim" modifier to the ability or damage against the non-combat player so long as the non-combat player is within the normal ranged distance of the weapon. Non-combat players may call defensive abilities in response to the auto-hits.

Aside from non-combat players, there may also be players who have special interactive considerations. This may include players with sleeping disorders who should not be abruptly woken up in the middle of the night, for example, as well as a medley of other possible considerations which must be determined on a case-by-case basis. Players with special interactive considerations should make an effort to leave notes, have a display in some fashion that informs others of the special interactive consideration, and to actually inform people verbally.

In order to qualify for non-combat or special interactive consideration status, a player should have a legitimate medical condition that can be confirmed by a qualified medical professional. Simply desiring to be non-combat or have a special interactive consideration for non-medical reasons is not generally permitted. A player typically must start an event as non-combat and remains non-combat for the entirety of the event. Situationally, non-combat status could fluctuate if the non-combat status was due to a temporary injury sustained at an event for as long as the player is injured, but this would be case-by-case and is not typical. Special interactive considerations are also something that typically is an "always on" status once approved. Please speak with an appropriate marshal or game owner if you want to be non-combat or have a special interactive consideration.

General Fighting Rules

The most intrinsic part of combat is the actual act of fighting. Various items govern how fighting occurs offensively, defensively, and tactically.

By default, no one can use a weapon nor can one utilize protection. A character needs an appropriate ability in order to wield a weapon or to use protection. Abilities also exist to enhance combat capabilities that characters have. Additionally, all physical damage and Physical Powers that strike a weapon are considered blocked and will have no effect unless otherwise specified. The only exception to this is if a Physical Power specifically has an effect against a weapon. If a weapon is broken from a Power, the weapon must be repaired using the Crafting and Repair rules. Until then, the weapon cannot be used. In the event a character has multiple weapons, he or she may use the same physrep for his or her other in-game weapons, provided that the physrep appropriately represents the other weapons that he or she has; however, a person must have all items that he or she carries on his or her person physrepped separately at all times. As such, using one physrep for multiple in-game combat items is not something that can be done in the midst of a combat situation.

Additional Details

The Combat Rules as a whole are very comprehensive and have much more depth to them. For those uninterested in combat, you can always rely on CLARIFY for specific combat rules that affect you at a game event. For those looking to understand all the ins-and-outs of these rules, please see Combat.

Physreps

All items in the game, be they weapons, shields, protection, or other require an approved “physical representation” or “physrep” for short. All approved combat physreps are either “boffer” or “latex.” Boffer weapons are constructed with duct tape, PVC pipe, pipe foam, and open cell foam. Latex weapons are constructed with a fiberglass core, liquid latex, foam, molds, and latex paint. Boffer shields are made from wood, closed cell foam, duct tape, paint, leather straps, and handles. Latex shields are made in the same way latex weapons are made.

All physreps must be approved by an appropriate marshal at the game. All boffer weapons must be constructed with 1/2-inch PVC pipe or 3/4-inch PVC pipe, properly fitted 5/8-inch thick PVC pipe foam, duct tape, and open cell foam, complete with 2-inch thrusting tips on each end of the weapon. Latex weapons are approved on a case-by-case basis. All boffer shields must be made with 5/8-inch pipe foam and duct tape to cover all exposed edges of the shield. Latex shields are governed under the same rules as latex weapons. Other types of physreps may be approved on a case-by-case basis as well, including Calimacil, boffers made from kite pole or graphite, and other item physreps.

Thrown Weapons also have specific physrep rules. Unlike a typical boffer or latex weapons, a thrown weapon cannot contain a core. However, aside from not having a core, thrown weapons are constructed in the exact same way a normal boffer or latex weapon would be constructed.

Bows and Arrows as well as Crossbows and Bolts in the game can be physrepped a number of ways. Real bows can be used so long as the bow itself does not have more than a 30 inch draw or 30 pound pull. Crossbows must not have more than a 30 pound pull as well. Arrows and bolts must have the tips or sharpened ends completely removed and blunted, also having a rubber stopper on the end with at least 2 inches of closed cell foam and duct tape covering it to create a boffer tip. Alternative to real bows or crossbows with these specs, nerf bows and crossbows are acceptable, so long as they are painted appropriately (always remember to keep the "tips" of any toy weapon the original bright color). Power Packets may not be used to physrep archery combat.

Firearms in the game can be physrepped with nerf weapons of appropriate size and function. Please consult with a marshal regarding what physreps are acceptable for what in-game firearms.

There are size categories for all melee weapon physreps in the game as well which help determine how weapon types need to be physrepped. Please keep them in mind if you decide to construct your own boffer weapon.

Weapon Type Category Size
Small Weapon Melee 18 to 24 inches total
One Handed Weapon Melee 24 to 44 inches total
Bastard Weapon Melee 42 to 50 inches total
Great Weapon Melee 48 to 92 inches total
Staff Melee 60 to 78 inches total
Shield Melee 39 inches maximum diameter or height
Small Thrown Weapon Ranged 4 to 16 inches total
Medium Thrown Weapon Ranged 16 to 32 inches total
Large Thrown Weapon Ranged 32 to 48 inches total

Some weapon physreps have “cross-over” sizes. In this case, those physreps can be used to physrep any weapon type it qualifies for.

Additionally, a person must have all items that they carry on their person physrepped at all times. As such, using one physrep for multiple in-game items is not something that can be done in the midst of a combat situation. If a character has more item cards than physreps, than the character cannot use those items for any mechanical purpose and the character must also have a container or bag large enough which could theoretically hold all of the in-game items. For smaller items such as components, you do not need to follow the normal physrep rules, you simply need a small bag or toolbox with appropriate in-game-looking physreps, the number of which are not unreasonably disproportionate to the number of component and kit item cards a player has.

Please note that an item card will ultimately govern what a character’s physrep represents in-game.

Lastly, if you are unsure on whether or not a specific physrep is appropriate for a specific in-game item, just clarify with a marshal.

Economy

The Economy is the means through which in-game monetary transactions are defined, either through looting, crafting, or simply trading Item Cards between players.

Looting

The act of searching a body of a slain enemy is also referred to as looting. In order to loot a body or incapacitated character, the searcher must announce their intent to the target that they wish to loot and must spend 30 seconds role-playing as though they are searching the body. Certain skills may decrease this time. Removing an item from an equipment slot takes the same amount of time as looting a body. Additionally, the character being searched must ask the looting character OOG to describe his or her search (ex: "Searching 1, Searching 2, Searching 3, Searching 4, Searching 5, I am checking your boots. Searching 8..."), as items or loot may be hidden in different areas. At the end of 30 seconds, the character being looted must give the looting character any IG items and item cards associated with those items that the character possessed. Concealed items may not be looted in this way. NPC's, once killed, are to remain for at least 15 seconds, unless instructed otherwise, to give characters an opportunity to search the body. Item Cards are cards given to NPCs for characters to loot them as well as cards used by PCs to denote that a physrep is an IG item.

To search and loot a player's belongings when the player is not present, a Marshal is required. Out-of-game theft, or going through a player's personal belongings without their express permission and / or an official marshal present should not be tolerated under any circumstances, will result in Violations, and can be punishable under applicable law.

Crafting and Repair

Crafting and Repair are a staple part of the game and the economy. Different Classes have access to different abilities for the purposes of Crafting and Repair and there are many different types of items in the game to Craft and Repair.

Items that are used in game must have physical representations of them and item cards that outline what the item is, its value, rank, etc. If it is your first event, or you just received the item that event, it is not expected that you have a phys rep readily available for every item you get. However, steps should be taken to obtain a phys rep should you decide you want to continue using that item at subsequent events.

For more information regarding Craft and Repair, Item Cards, a comprehensive list of Items in the game, and more economy-related specifics, see Economy.

Violations

All written aspects of a skill, including the description, should be worded as best as possible by a game's rules team to prevent confusion and abuse. However, there may be certain combinations of abilities and traits or wording that could imply ambiguity in what the skill does or perhaps allows for a very powerful, "infinite combo" or the like. The spirit of the rules of the game, especially when it comes to specific abilities and traits, is not to have unstoppable, over-the-top abilities that allow for infinite combos or similar over-powered concepts. If you see such a way to use the rules, rather than do so, please ask an appropriate marshal first to make sure that is how the ability or abilities in question are meant to work. Failing to do this could result in rules violations.

As with any rule system, there are ways to break the rules, and in such cases formal Violations can and will be issued by qualified marshals. For a comprehensive explanation of Violations and their associated consequences, please see Violations.

Death and Taxes

Death and Taxes, or D&T for short, is a unique system used to quantify the process of between-event character actions. Players utilize D&T Points to submit requests to Plot regarding intended actions taken by their character between live events. D&T actions can be anything from simple communications with NPCs, custom-item Research and Development, or even complex multi-character missions that have profound impacts on in-game events. D&Ts are a unique opportunity for players and characters to shape storylines and character development, and offer near-infinite possibilities for player creativity.

Please see Death and Taxes for more information.